The Federalist Papers were written and published during the years 1787 and 1788 in several New York State newspapers to persuade New York voters to ratify the proposed constitution.

In total, the Federalist Papers consist of 85 essays outlining how this new government would operate and why this type of government was the best choice for the United States of America. All of the essays were signed “PUBLIUS” and the actual authors of some are under dispute, but the general consensus is that Alexander Hamilton wrote 52, James Madison wrote 28, and John Jay contributed the remaining five.

The Importance of the Union (1-14)

FEDERALIST No. 1 General Introduction Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 2 Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence John Jay
FEDERALIST No. 3 Concerning Dangers From Foreign Force and Influence (con’t) John Jay
FEDERALIST No. 4 Concerning Dangers From Foreign Force and Influence (con’t) John Jay
FEDERALIST No. 5 Concerning Dangers From Foreign Force and Influence (con’t) John Jay
FEDERALIST No. 6 Concerning Dangers from Dissensions Between the States Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 7 Concerning Dangers from Dissensions Between the States (con’t) Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 8 The Consequences of Hostilities Between the States Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 9 The Union as a Safeguard Against Domestic Faction and Insurrection Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 10 The Union as a Safeguard Against Domestic Faction and Insurrection (con’t) James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 11 The Utility of the Union in Respect to Commercial Relations and a Navy Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 12 The Utility of the Union In Respect to Revenue Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 13 Advantage of the Union in Respect to Economy in Government Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 14 Objections to the Proposed Constitution From Extent of Territory Answered James Madison

Defects of the Articles of Confederation (15-22)

FEDERALIST No. 15 The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 16 The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (con’t) Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 17 The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (con’t) Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 18 The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (con’t) Alexander Hamilton and James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 19 The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (con’t) Alexander Hamilton and James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 20 The Insufficiency fo the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (con’t) Alexander Hamilton and James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 21 Other Defects of the Present Confederation Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 22 Other Defects of the Present Confederation (con’t) Alexander Hamilton

Arguments for the Type of Government Contained in the Constitution (23-36)

FEDERALIST No. 23 The Necessity of a Government as Energetic as the One Proposed to the Preservation of the Union Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 24 The Powers Necessary to the Common Defense Further Considered Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 25 The Powers Necessary to the Common Defense Further Considered (con’t) Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 26 The Idea of Restraining the Legislative Authority in Regard to the Common Defense Considered Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 27 The Idea of Restraining the Legislative Authority in Regard to the Common Defense Considered (con’t) Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 28 The Idea of Restraining the Legislative Authority in Regard to the Common Defense Considered (con’t) Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 29 Concerning the Militia Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 30 Concerning the General Power of Taxation Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 31 Concerning the General Power of Taxation (con’t) Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 32 Concerning the General Power of Taxation (con’t) Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 33 Concerning the General Power of Taxation (con’t) Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 34 Concerning the General Power of Taxation (con’t) Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 35 Concerning the General Power of Taxation (con’t) Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 36 Concerning the General Power of Taxation (con’t) Alexander Hamilton

The Republican Form of Government (37-51)

FEDERALIST No. 37 Concerning the Difficulties of the Convention in Devising a Proper Form of Government James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 38 The Same Subject Continued, and the Incoherence of the Objections to the New Plan Exposed James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 39 The Conformity of the Plan to Republican Principles James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 40 The Powers of the Convention to Form a Mixed Government Examined and Sustained James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 41 General View of the Powers Conferred by The Constitution James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 42 The Powers Conferred by the Constitution Further Considered James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 43 The Powers Conferred by the Constitution Further Considered (con’t) James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 44 Restrictions on the Authority of the Several States James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 45 The Alleged Danger From the Powers of the Union to the State Governments Considered James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 46 The Influence of the State and Federal Governments Compared James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 47 The Particular Structure of the New Government and the Distribution of Power Among Its Different Parts James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 48 These Departments Should Not Be So Far Separated as to Have No Constitutional Control Over Each Other James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 49 Method of Guarding Against the Encroachments of Any One Department of Government by Appealing to the People Through a Convention Alexander Hamilton or James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 50 Periodical Appeals to the People Considered Alexander Hamilton or James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 51 The Structure of the Government Must Furnish the Proper Checks and Balances Between the Different Departments Alexander Hamilton or James Madison

The Legislative Branch (52-66)

FEDERALIST No. 52 The House of Representatives Alexander Hamilton or James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 53 The House of Representatives (con’t) Alexander Hamilton or James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 54 The Apportionment of Members Among the States Alexander Hamilton or James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 55 The Total Number of the House of Representatives Alexander Hamilton or James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 56 The Total Number of the House of Representatives (con’t) Alexander Hamilton or James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 57 The Alleged Tendency of the New Plan to Elevate the Few at the Expense of the Many Considered in Connection with Representation Alexander Hamilton or James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 58 Objection That The Number of Members Will Not Be Augmented as the Progress of Population Demands Considered James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 59 Concerning the Power of Congress to Regulate the Election of Members Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 60 Concerning the Power of Congress to Regulate the Election of Members (con’t) Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 61 Concerning the Power of Congress to Regulate the Election of Members (con’t) Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 62 The Senate Alexander Hamilton or James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 63 The Senate (con’t) Alexander Hamilton or James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 64 The Powers of the Senate John Jay
FEDERALIST No. 65 The Powers of the Senate (con’t) Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 66 Objections to the Power of the Senate To Set as a Court for Impeachments Further Considered Alexander Hamilton

The Executive Branch (67-77)

FEDERALIST No. 67 The Executive Department Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 68 The Mode of Electing the President Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 69 The Real Character of the Executive Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 70 The Executive Department Further Considered Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 70 The Executive Department Further Considered Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 71 The Duration in Office of the Executive Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 72 The Same Subject Continued, and Re-Eligibility of the Executive Considered Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 73 The Provision For The Support of the Executive, and the Veto Power Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 74 The Command of the Military and Naval Forces, and the Pardoning Power of the Executive Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 75 The Treaty-Making Power of the Executive Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 76 The Appointing Power of the Executive Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 77 The Appointing Power Continued and Other Powers of the Executive Considered Alexander Hamilton

The Judicial Branch (78-83)

FEDERALIST No. 78 The Judiciary Department Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 79 The Judiciary (con’t) Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 80 The Powers of the Judiciary Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 81 The Judiciary Continued, and the Distribution of the Judicial Authority Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 82 The Judiciary Continued Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 83 The Judiciary Continued in Relation to Trial by Jury Alexander Hamilton

Conclusions and Miscellaneous Ideas

FEDERALIST No. 84 Certain General and Miscellaneous Objections to the Constitution Considered and Answered Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 85 Concluding Remarks Alexander Hamilton

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“What do we mean by the American Revolution? Do we mean the American war? The Revolution was effected before the war commenced. The Revolution was in the minds and hearts of the people; a change in their religious sentiments, of their duties and obligations…This radical change in the principles, opinions, sentiments, and affections of the people was the real American Revolution.” John Adams

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